Archives for category: Food

 

 

 

 

a bit of our view

a bit of our view

It is with a mixture of pride and sadness that we are announcing that after three great years of art, herbalism, community-building, collaborations, vernissages, workshops, special events and fun… we are moving on.

interviewed for Documentary

Tammy interviewed for documentary Fairly Foul

So very much happened in three years!  Special events in Fleurbain included artist presentations, poetry readings, and yoga and dance classes. Workshops in herbalism, crafting, felt-making, painting, cosmetic creation, and health were always well-received. We had a lot (a LOT) of fun putting on these productions and we wouldn’t have done anything differently.

Our dear friend Cindy and her husband Bob came to visit all the way from Michigan.

Our dear friend Cindi and her husband Bob came all the way from Michigan for a visit.

 

Posing with Darlene St. Georges during her beautiful vernissage.

In the beginning.

 

 

 

holiday views

holiday views

 

People were the most important part of our experience.  Thank-you to all who came to the events!!!  Popular vernissages were a chance to not only see some artworks and enjoy some treats, but provided an opportunity for attendees to meet new friends, and to connect with other artistic folks. This was one of the most valuable benefits of maintaining a physical space, so we hope to see all of you again in the near future around town! Do connect with Tammy on Facebook, and Natasha too.

the impermanence of plant pigments on snow contrast well with the bright lights of an electric cityThe impermanence of plant pigments on snow contrast well with the bright lights of an electric city.  From Nuit Blanche the year before we moved into the downtown space.
Abundance by Lorraine Miller Emmrys.

Abundance by Lorraine Miller Emmrys.

 

 

great visits

great visits

food, art, herbalism and fun at Fleurbain

food, art, herbalism and fun at Fleurbain

 

Natasha with a few of her own works-in-progress

Natasha with a few of her own works-in-progress

What are we doing now? Tammy is booking private consultations and making tea and natural products for all your herbalist-needs in her new space in downtown Montreal. Contact her for more details or if you want to be added to her mailing list.  Her email is tammy.schmidt.herbalist (at) gmail (dot) com. Natasha is happily selling her work online, and through ArtBomb. Please email her (NatashaHendersonArt(at) gmail (dot) com) if you would like to be added to her mailing list for upcoming exhibitions.

Thank you everyone for all you have done, for your support, and your friendship. Looking forward to hearing from you soon!

Natasha Henderson and Tammy Schmidt.

Tammy leading a large workshop for Femme Toxic on organic, herbal skincare

Tammy leading a large workshop for Femme Toxic on organic, herbal skincare

during the exhibition "Art and Architecture" we hosted artist talks

during the exhibition “Art and Architecture” we hosted artist talks

a student paints during a class

a student paints during a class with Natasha

Fleurbain Naturals is launched!

Fleurbain Naturals is launched!

Bye for now.  Hope to see you soon!

Bye for now. Hope to see you soon!

 

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Fleurbain Truffles

3/4 c old fashioned oats (pulverized in a food processor)

3/4 c macadamia and cashew nut-butter (or a nut-butter of your choice)

1/4 c cocoa

2 tbsp honey

1 tbsp coconut oil

1 tsp vanilla

3 tbsp amaretto

1 tsp cinnamon

1/4 c chopped dried cherries

1/4 mini chocolate chips

Mix together and form into truffles.  Store in the fridge.

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Damiana Joy+Love Liqueur

I brought this to a winter party a few years ago.  People found this drink both intriguing and fun.  Damiana is quite aromatic due to volatile oils.  The flavour of damiana can be subdued or enhanced with other foods associated with joy and warmth; cardamom, almond, vanilla, cherry, cinnamon and chocolate.  In terms of medicinal properties, one of my favourite summaries is from Rosemary Gladstar.  In her Family Herbal she states, “…it is completely restorative; it restores exhausted nerves, exhausted dreams and exhausted spirit.”  Though there is a folk history of use as an aphrodisiac, herbalists generally qualify this herb as a mild anti-depressant, particularly useful in what David Winston calls a stagnant depression.  The volatile oils act as carminatives that aid in digestion.

1/2 c damiana tincture

1/2 c amaretto

1/4 c chocolate sauce (I made my own from unsweetened chocolate, water, maple syrup, sugar and vanilla)

rosewater and vanilla to taste

Pour together and store in the fridge.  Could it be any easier?  Enjoy a small shot when desired.

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Cheers!

These photos were taken during the LAB Series which runs on Thursdays between 3-6pm. Next week, February 21st, Tammy Schmidt will continue in a similar vein demonstrating herbs used to lighten our spirits in the dark of winter.  We hope you are able to join us!

Fleurbain is at 460 St Catherine West, Unit 917, Montreal.

Flavour is another reason for using weeds in food.

Herbalists like myself love to talk about the wonderful nutritional benefits to be discovered in common garden weeds such as lambs quarters, stinging nettles, dandelion, chickweed and many, many more.  The above link introduces you to how weeds make food more enticing in terms of taste.  If  herbalists are not so convincing when we go on and on about nutritious weeds, perhaps this article can convince you to try them for the flavour.  I still remember the first time I tried a weed as a gourmet food.  My neighbour, Eleanor, invited me over for lunch and she added chickweed to the salad.  This weed tasted fresh, cool and sweet.  The flavour reminded me of corn on the cob and it was simply delicious.

Do you cook with common weeds?  I would love to hear about it.

(A note to the nature newbies!  If you do not know how to identify plants, you should seek out experts who can introduce these plants to you.)

Thanks to Sarka, my good friend and the author of Wellness Intel, for passing along this article to me.  I do love it!

Have a great weekend, everyone!

English: Stinging nettles (Urtica dioica).

Stinging nettles (Urtica dioica)

Over the last few weeks I have made a conscious effort to change my diet. I have been nourishing myself with good food, learning which foods I have sensitivities to, and talking through the entire process with a supportive group of people all doing the same thing. I have lost about ten or so pounds, have lost inches from my waist, and feel like a zillion bucks. How much is a zillion? It is a lot.

The supportive benefits of this experience are untold. I am energised and educated. I am empowered. I have not done this alone; I would not have known where to find trustworthy information. My friend (and yours!) Tammy the Clinical Herbal Therapist has spent years in research and educating herself on this, as well as other health-related subjects. How fortunate we are that she can help us!

I am currently at the stage where I can reintroduce foods into my diet. Who would have thought a yellow pepper would suddenly be so zingy? I have a sensitivity to peppers. I will, therefore try to eliminate them from my diet. Easy to figure this out!

Having learned new recipes over the last few weeks, old standbys that I had been accustomed to buying and eating daily are surprisingly simple to replace. I didn’t think that I could live without cheese. This is one of the things that I will soon be re-introducing. I am looking forward to the experiment, and hope that I am not sensitive to cheese. However if I am… I will still be able to feed myself!

I have learned something new: Organic pumpkin seed butter is my friend.

I wholeheartedly recommend the next Nourishment series, starting up this upcoming Monday the 16th of April. Email Tammy at Fleurbain@gmail.com to register, or for more info.

-Natasha Henderson Montreal

This is something I introduced to my family a few years ago. At first my family did not know what they were; they had so many questions! Why are these cookies so small? Are these cookies for humans? Uhhh, yes. After a brief explanation, these peppernuts have been a continuous hit. I decided to modify the recipe for my brother Tyler, because he seems to feel better on a gluten-free diet.

The original recipe was given to me by a sweet lady I know named Margaret Boldt from Osler, Saskatchewan. I think her recipe is the best because she is not afraid to use the right amount of spice.

Since rice flour is perfect for cookies, doing gluten-free is easy and advantageous with this recipe ; rice flour is sweet and it makes baked goods extra crunchy.

Gluten-free Peppernuts

2 cups of rice flour (brown or white)

1 ½ cups of gluten free flour (Bob’s Red Mill)

2 tsp baking soda

¼ tsp salt

1 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp cloves

1 tsp nutmeg

1 tsp cardamom

3 tsp star anise

1 tsp ginger

¼ tsp pepper

1 cup unsalted butter

1 ¼ cups brown sugar

½ cup molasses, honey or maple syrup

2 eggs

2 tsp vanilla extract

Mix together the flours, baking soda, salt and spices.  In a separate bowl, cream together butter and brown sugar, then add molasses, eggs and vanilla.  Add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients.

Shape into two flat discs and refrigerate in containers or Ziploc bags for at least an hour.

Preheat the oven to 350’F.

On a gluten free floured surface, roll out a disc and form a long cigar shape.  Using a sharp knife, cut these into little peppernut shapes.  Place on a parchment lined cookie sheet and bake for 10-12 minutes, or until golden.

It usually makes the most sense to freeze something you are not going to eat right away.  These cookies keep very well for a long period of time in a sealed container that is placed in a cool location likely because they are dry and there is a high amount of anti-oxidant spices in them.

Tammy Schmidt, Montreal.

Christmas is quickly approaching and I am in a bit of a funk. I guess this is what happens when you put together the following:

  • I enjoy making traditional foods to mark the holidays,
  • I lost 25 pounds this year by maintaining a somewhat consistent effort in modifying my diet and adding a good dose of exercise (Yes, I did!),
  • I have witnessed clients and friends also lose a lot of weight this year by doing the same thing,
  • and I also have watched others receive diagnoses for illnesses related to diet and lifestyle; namely, Type II Diabetes.

Yeah, she is totally over-thinking this one. Go back to sleep Rosebud!

You might suppose that I am over-thinking the whole thing. I can hear a voice say, “… but it is only a few days… you can easily work that off in a matter of weeks… you are so good most of the time!” Well, I hate to admit it, but the holiday eating usually lasts for more than a few days. Getting back into shape is not always an easy thing. I keep in mind that I am a habitual person; if I become accustomed to eating sugar everyday, then it is really difficult to make the change back to not having a daily dose of sweets. This is not just me. Overall, the traditional holiday eating has simply become too much. It can become sugar overkill once I add up my family’s special treats, my partner’s and friend’s special treats, and so forth. And really, this does not do anyone any good.

In some ways, however, I might not have the same problem this year. First of all, I am now running a business. My business really keeps me occupied, and so I don’t have the same amount of time to think about creative culinary pursuits. Bye, bye Martha-Stewart-me!  As well, I have seriously started to crave daily exercise.  Most days when I think, “Oooo, I should start baking!”  I have to run off to a dance class. All of a sudden that baking is not as important to me.  Oh yeah, perspectives change in the process of running, jumping and moving about. Being fit quickly becomes very important to me because I simply want to enjoy growing further in doing what I love to do.  Since this year’s Christmas Eve and Christmas Day are on the weekend, I also think it will be a shorter celebration that will not last for days and days.

One thing that helps me feel alright about dropping some of the supposedly necessary, but not very healthy traditions is to remember that it is the people that keep traditions alive.  We all share the power to make this year happen in so many different ways.  We can make our traditions something that is beneficial to ourselves and to our loved ones. I think realizing this truth has been hard work for me this year. I have never faced all of this with such honesty! Wow! I know professionally what my clients need to hear when they face certain health problems, and I know how to put together 12 kinds of cookies and squares for the holidays. But I am finally letting each of these types of knowledge come face to face. Viola: the funk!

So, back to the drawing board I go!  My friend Chitra says, “don’t bake anything this year!”  I am not sure I am ready to do this, but I am ready to do the following:

  • Seriously scale back on the sweets and sweet drinks. Instead of many different kinds of cookies, I have narrowed it down to two: gluten-free peppernuts (I will share the recipe with you tomorrow) and chocolate shortbread cookies. I might also do Christmas Rocky Road… but that is it! I can hear some of you say, “But what about regular shortbread, and butter tarts, and Christmas cake, and peanut brittle, and nanaimo bars, and sugar cookies, and almond crescents, and truffles, and gingerbread, and fudge, and peppermint cookies, and, and…” Well, I just can’t do that. Not this year.
  • Allow myself to move beyond tradition and create what I know are totally healthy, digestible and guilt-free meals with fish, vegetables, meats, nuts and fresh fruit. Making a plan that doesn’t cause worry is like a new way to relax.
  • Focus on making gifts for loved ones that are not food related: a homemade hand cream, a tea, a knit scarf, and so on. I have lots of ideas.
  • Share time with friends and family that involves more MOVE and less FOOD. We will go play outside. What?  Yes, it’s cold outside! We can wear layers, my friends. Bundle up and expand on tradition!

Tammy Schmidt, Montreal.

I have a recipe that will add such deliciousness and ease to your day.

It is a quick tomato sauce with incredible tang and richness and it was given to me by my yoga instructor and friend who is committed to helping the world stress less, Chitra.

The tomato sauce recipe is as simple as this.

  • Pour a nice amount, like 1 tablespoon, of olive oil in a pan over medium heat.
  • Add a little garlic and gently brown.
  • As the garlic is browning, slice cherry tomatoes in half.  Put a little X at the round end of each half, if you want.  Place each tomato cut side down in the pan.
  • Add a little fresh or dried rosemary.  Allow to quickly simmer into a delicious sauce.  Add a little salt and pepper to taste.
  • A couple ways to use this sauce include; in a toasted baguette with cheese or over roast vegetables, such as cauliflower.
Thank-you, Chitra!  Peace and Namaste.

chill cat

Tammy Schmidt, Montreal

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