Archives for posts with tag: sprouts

chicken, sprouts, cheese, and extra flavours

I like to eat well. Every couple of weeks I make a chicken, I buy (and sometimes take the time to grow) organic sprouts. I prefer unpasteurised cheese (less processing and better flavour!) I am trying to avoid the mysterious ingredients and priciness of restaurant or take-out foods. No I am not perfect, and too often enjoy indulgences, but for day-to-day living this plan has been working for me.

delicious and convenient

 For my typical busily scheduled day, this lunch is about as perfect as a lunch can get:

Layer in a glass jar:

  • pieces of boneless chicken
  • sprouts (or other salad greens, should you have them)
  • pieces of tasty cheese
  • a glob of mustard
  • about two tablespoons of olive oil and balsamic or red wine vinegar
  • sprinkle of salt, pepper, dill

Close up, shake around as much as you wish, and take with a fork to eat later. Mmm…

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

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Today’s the day… time for an early harvest of my tiny sprouts! I know I could grow them for two or three more days, but I am anxious to give them a taste. Tonight they will find their cute little way into a mixed salad.

about to leave their glass home for the free-living lifestyle of a salad

I will immediately “plant” more in the jar. In a day or two I’ll start another jar’s worth of sprouts, so that I will have sprouts ready every couple of days.

little pals, eager to nourish? I hope so

In the future, I’ll have two or three different sorts of sprouts, and do this staggered method of germination and harvesting with all of them. I’ll refine the system, and try to set it up to look nice, too.

I love sprouts! Gardening you don’t need to put on shoes or a coat for…

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

soaking alfalfa seeds next to the spider plant that my cat likes to eat

As those of you who peeked at this website yesterday probably know, I am attempting to grow sprouts inside my living-space/studio for the first time. Just now I soaked, swirled, and now am re-soaking my seeds; the next thing to do is wait about 2-5 hours, then drain them. After that all I need to do is to rinse them twice a day, and watch them grow.

germinate! germinate!

I used a bit of old washcloth for my “mesh”, as that’s what I had available. I’d tried, firstly, to use a bit of an old shirt that never really fit right, but the fabric was too tightly woven. Bad purchase, that shirt! Anyhow, the old wash cloth (dish towel style) seems to work ok. I’ll let you know if it does really work in the end. I think there might be an issue with it retaining moisture, and apparently a problem with sprouting seeds is too much humidity. There is a chance they will mould, and then I can’t eat them. I might need to purchase a metal type of lightweight mesh. I really do not want to use any plastic in this production! That is one of the reasons I am trying this, I was tired of buying sprouts packaged in plastic.

Here’s to new life!

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

the location where my sprouts will inhabit, too. The spider plant and catgrass will welcome their new little buddies.

I have wanted to try growing edible food inside my home for quite some time. I’ve not any sort of outdoor space attached to my home, but have been craving my own little “kitchen garden“. A year ago, I had some basil in my bathroom, sandwiched in between my bath and a window (it’s a special sort of bathroom design, if I ever clean it and decorate perhaps I’ll find an excuse to post an image of it…) but my cat had other ideas. I’ve recently gotten into buying organic sprouts, so I think it was only natural that I eventually would decide to try growing them for myself!

I have my packet of seeds (purchased in a Healthfood store), my wide-mouth jar, some rubber bands, and running water in my home. The last thing I need is a sort of mesh that I can strain the seeds on. I’ll come up with something.

The seeds I bought this first time were alfalfa, but I might try some other varieties (peas, broccoli…) once I become an expert at this. Expect full documentation.

I’ve long heard about the beneficial aspects of sprouts, and now’s the time to really give it a go!

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

Curly kale

curly kale

It is such a shame to spend money on tender greens, then take them home and find out that they froze on the way back from the store.  After many years of experiencing this, I now use a variety of foods, other than baby salad greens, to get greens in the winter. Here is a short list of ones that I like.

Tough Leaves. Kale is one of my favourites.  It can be stir fried, steamed, or made into some of the best chips.  Black kale is more tender and can be used in salads.  Collards and cabbage are also great.  Rapini and Romaine lettuce can often make it home, no problem.

Nutritive Teas such as Nettles. Nettles can also be powdered and mixed with smoothies and food.  Matcha green tea is another good option.

Hearty Herbs. I love adding fresh flat leafed parsley to foods.  Usually, it makes it home without freezing.  Yes, it would be bleak to only rely on dried herbs, but I consider herbs, even if they are dried, to be a source of greens.  Herbs preserved in salt are also a source of greens, but obviously they can not be the only source without over doing it on salt.

Seaweed. I love little snippets of seaweed added to all kinds of foods; pizza, salad, soup, rice or other grains.  Sometimes I will add bits of Laver, a wild Atlantic Nori, to a trailmix or I will eat it like chips.  Alaria, a wild Atlantic Wakame, can be added to salads or soups.  Dulse is nice on pizza, mixed with salsa, or in sandwiches.  Kelp chips are fun.  Kelp can also be added to rice, beans or soups.

Frozen Spinach.  At my local grocery store, I can pick-up spinach that is frozen into little individually portioned “spinach pucks.”  I quickly thaw out and use these pucks in dishes.  I add them to fried shallots and eggs to make a nice plate of green eggs in the morning.

Lactofermented Cabbage and Other Veg.  In small portions, this will aid digestion, and it adds a little something extra to a meal.  If you are looking for a great book on fermentation, check out Wild Fermentation by Sandor Ellix Katz.  This is an awesome , well researched and easy to follow book on fermentation.

Sprouts. I love sunflower sprouts and I am told that they are really easy to grow.  I would like to try sprouting these this winter.

Greens powder. This has got to be my least favourite, but I will take them from time to time.  Many people claim to have good results with green powders, especially when they take them on a regular basis.

Tammy Schmidt, Montreal

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