Archives for posts with tag: eating

soaking alfalfa seeds next to the spider plant that my cat likes to eat

As those of you who peeked at this website yesterday probably know, I am attempting to grow sprouts inside my living-space/studio for the first time. Just now I soaked, swirled, and now am re-soaking my seeds; the next thing to do is wait about 2-5 hours, then drain them. After that all I need to do is to rinse them twice a day, and watch them grow.

germinate! germinate!

I used a bit of old washcloth for my “mesh”, as that’s what I had available. I’d tried, firstly, to use a bit of an old shirt that never really fit right, but the fabric was too tightly woven. Bad purchase, that shirt! Anyhow, the old wash cloth (dish towel style) seems to work ok. I’ll let you know if it does really work in the end. I think there might be an issue with it retaining moisture, and apparently a problem with sprouting seeds is too much humidity. There is a chance they will mould, and then I can’t eat them. I might need to purchase a metal type of lightweight mesh. I really do not want to use any plastic in this production! That is one of the reasons I am trying this, I was tired of buying sprouts packaged in plastic.

Here’s to new life!

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

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Big Cheese -copyright Natasha Henderson

Postcard of Dominion Square in Montreal, Quebe...

Dominion Square

The Dominion Square Tavern is a wonderful Montreal restaurant that is steeped in history. The Dominion’s recent incarnation as a restaurant has only been open for just over a year, however the place has been around since the late 1920’s.

Situated in the heart of the Golden Square Mile (once Canada’s richest neighbourhood), the Tavern was originally adjoined to the Dominion Hotel. The hotel burned down in the 1930’s, but thankfully the Tavern survived the blaze. The Dominion had been Montreal’s first Gay Bar during the 1970’s. Only in 1988 were women allowed past its doors due to a new law.

Thankfully, throughout the years the owners and managers of the space have maintained the charming décor in true Roaring Twenties style. Much of the décor seems to be either original or actual period work. The terrazzo floors are bordered by porcelain-tile wainscoting, and some of the ornate brass lamps hanging from the ceiling still have pull-chains hanging from their bases. The walls testify to the  ‘Dominion’; the coat-of-arms for each province hang there. Somehow the soft leather winged chairs are curved to perfectly coddle your kidneys. This comes in useful after sampling the cocktails. There is so much more to sit back and take in. The Dominion is perfect for pondering.

Tuesday's lunch plate: seared trout

Besides the decor, history, the charming clientele and the pleasantness of the wait staff, there is the food. A winning idea in the Dominion is the daily lunch special: The Dish of The Day. One main dish, with a side salad or soup is $20. A glass of wine or pint of beer is an additional $6. The lunch special of seared trout is light and satisfying.  Perfect for a Tuesday! On Thursday, the Duck Confit is simply amazing. In this one leg of duck, there are about five distinct attributes. It is rich, succulent and meaty. There is an indescribable divine tenderness in the meat, fat and skin that is just all-out flavour. A few little thinly crisped potato pieces add a crunchy treat, and the hollandaise sauce that surrounds the duck could not be any more appropriate.

pulled pork sandwich; delicately flavoured yet hearty. Very hot fries.

Starter salad and side salads are fresh, made from watercress, with bits of herbs such as dill and fennel added. The dressing is light and tasty, smoothing the path for the healthy greens to be digested.

I happily ordered the Pulled Pork sandwich on two separate occasions. This sandwich is lightly flavoured with a tangy mustard and fennel sauce. The bread is a house-baked bun, large but not overwhelming. A very generous pile of steaming hot fries accompanies the sandwich, and an overflowing, marvellous bowl of house mayonnaise accompanies the fries. The fries stay hot for a good long time, as fries in good restaurants tend to; I am quite certain that they are cooked in duckfat. A starter salad is a good idea if you order this, to try to fill up on greens before diving into the huge pile of delicious fries and sauce.

ploughman's plate: a chance to try headcheese

Except for the micro-brewery beers, the drinks at the Dominion are all made in-house. This goes for the syrups as well as the filtered water. The house even makes its own tonic water. In the case of the latter, the gin and tonics are quite simply the best in town. Not only is there a good choice of gins for the mix, no other G&T tastes quite like theirs. There is absolutely no harm in establishing a cocktails budget to make the round of the Dominion cocktail menu.

All of the above are served in excellent glassware. Beer pints are, simply, adorable in their roundness. Beer just tastes better when it is served in a large, rounded glass! Perhaps this aids in the appreciation of the beer’s bouquet.

celebrating a birthday with sticky toffee pudding and homemade coffee ice cream



If you still have room, finish off your meal with a sticky toffee pudding, a nutmeg donut, or anything that suits your fancy from the dessert menu. You will not be disappointed.

Dominion Square Tavern, 1243 Metcalfe Street Montreal. Monday-Friday 11:30 to midnight, Saturday 5pm to midnight. 514-564-5056 Reservations welcome.

Processed Eating Opportunities. Copyright Natasha Henderson

Christmas flyer?

As I sit here, hypnotized by pleasant photos and cheery colours and persuaded by promise, I have to hand it to him; he really knows how to get a gal excited about the holidays!  Galen Weston, I have no idea why I am under the influence of his spell, other than having just flipped through the President’s Choice ‘Insider’s Report’ for this Christmas.  And I am all aglow.  The odds were against us.  It must be purely magic that keeps us together.  Aside from the box of baby greens, none of his advertised products are organic.  The special coffee shop in the flyer does not feature any fair-trade coffee.  I officially do not eat sweets.  I feel better when I avoid dairy and gluten.  And I dislike too many processed foods in my diet.  But when I read through ‘Insider’s Report’ I want to try one of everything.  Just reading it restores my confidence, Christmas will be okay.  Yes, I have already started making wonderful homespun creations for the celebration.  I am not trying to brag about it, a person has to pace herself when dealing with this holiday!  And I have a plan for a nutrient dense, delightful Christmas. Seeing all of the products in this book, however, makes me want to add a few items to the plan.  Mr. Weston states that it’s all for a good cause.  Me.  Getting me out of the kitchen, making it easy for me to entertain and saving me money!  It’s the President’s Choice!  Let’s see, let’s see.  The wild pacific salmon wellingtons would be a hit at parties and the artichoke and asiago puffs look good.  The 100% sparkling fruit juice would be handy.  And, ooh, the red velvet cheesecake is so elegant, the merry mini cheesecakes look so cute and anything dulce de leche is delicious.  Okay, all of the desserts look good.  And what’s this on page 26?  Holiday blooms of orchids, amaryllis and pointsettias; wouldn’t that be lovely for my décor?  The wildly colourful chocolate fruit fancies make me want to have children.

Anyhoo, I am sharing all of this with you because I know I am not the only one who feels this way.  And I have to say, there is something here that keeps me coming back for more, but only unofficially… I am an herbalist after all.

Now that's more like it! Enjoying one of our favourites, homemade tourtière with a side of greens.

 

Friends, do not throw out my flyer!

This confession was made by Tammy Schmidt, Montreal!

 
by Natasha Henderson, Montreal
 

When I moved across the country from British Columbia’s Vancouver Island to Montreal, Quebec a little over three years ago, I knew that I would experience many changes. Not the least of these changes, I felt, would be to my diet.

The view from Kitty Coleman, in the Comox Valley

I had in mind that I would indulge in new things, new foods, perhaps try French Cuisine… it is true that I experienced some change in my diet and lifestyle, and a lot of that was due to what was available in the supermarkets. Different vegetables, different prices, smaller cuts of meat, and a wider selection of new cheeses greeted me at the first supermarket I visited in the downtown core of Montreal. After a couple of months I learned about the fresh farmer’s markets in the city. I began shopping for goods that were more locally grown, and in season whenever possible. Now, three years into life here, I am signed onto a CSA programme with a local organic farm for weekly veggie and fruit delivery. While enjoying the process of transformations within my new life in a new city and province, I was developing an interest in what I was putting into my mouth… an interest beyond the question of simply flavour.

Festivities and poutine abound in Montreal

After realising how much I liked poutine, but how guilty I always felt whenever I indulged, I figured that I must find a way to make a healthier option of it… something I could do at home, too, and save a little cash in the process. The first thing that I tried was to purchase frozen fries at the grocery store, and whenever I had some leftover gravy (not that often, of course… it’s GRAVY) I would make poutine the next day. While experimenting a little more with cooking, I finally discovered the joyous root that is the sweet potato. One day I had some potatoes, so made some wedgie-fries like my mom used to make out of their delightful Yukon Gold potatoes from the home garden in Comox, BC. Butter in a pan in the oven, bake. Easy. I thought about some fried sweet potato chips a friend had treated me to a year or so before that, this seemingly exotic chip. We had dipped them in home-made mayonnaise. That’s another delightful story… I had found the intense flavour of the sweet potato a little powerful, a little overwhelming. So I made a batch of wedgies with some potato, some sweet potato. Perfect combination (for me, anyhow).

Using sweet potatoes in place of, or as well as, regular potatoes for the fries is a tasty option that makes a poutine “healthy”. Sweet potatoes are full of vitamins. Their flesh is a bright, appetizing orange, and their flavour carries a pleasant sweetness. Try to leave the skin on for your fries, like you would with regular potatoes. Just cut off the ugliest bits, and the “eyes“. Cut the sweet potatoes and potatoes into even-thickness strips, like house-fries in restaurants. One healthy option for baking the fries is to use butter or olive oil and fry them in a pan until soft, then bake until crisp. Another is to simply bake them in the oven until they are crisp, using no fat at all, or you can add a little olive oil or butter on the pan for taste. When the fries go in the oven, try sprinkling some salt, pepper, chilli pepper, garlic, steak spice, rosemary… any spice or flavouring that you like on them. You could even add some grated parmesan cheese, though with the upcoming level of cheese curds it might not be necessary. Bake them at 350 degrees for about an hour, or until done to your liking.

Options for the gravy include using butter or olive oil as a tasty start; you don‘t have to have fat drippings from a roast. To thicken and add flavour, stir into the saucepan a small handful of flour, about 2 tablespoons (depending on quantity of gravy you are making). If you’d prefer to not use flour, try using another starchy substance, such as cooked lentils or beans that have been mashed a little with a fork. Once browned, thin out the roux (browned flour or other starch) with a little veggie, beef or chicken stock. Use wine, beer, or water if you have no stock. Bring to bubbling while stirring, then simmer and reduce, adding more of your chosen liquid (or now switch to plain water) as you go. During this reduction process, I like to add a good generous sprinkle of pepper. Other spices can be added, according to your taste. Rosemary, garlic, paprika… the kitchen ceiling‘s the limit. Or, just leave it plain, and practice gravy-making to find your own favourite combo!

Poutine, the "UN-Healthy" version. Click to read CTV story...

The fries will take about an hour once in the oven, and the gravy can be re-heated once it’s made, so I would start in on making the gravy as soon as your fries are baking. That way the fries will be nice and hot when it is time to eat them, and that is quite important for full enjoyment of poutine. You can find cheese curds readily throughout Quebec, and in some regions across Canada. However if there are none in your supermarket, there are other options. A white, flavourful cheese is all right to use for this poutine (though purists would argue not.) I have used Edam, or Havarti, or Old Cheddar as a cheese curd replacement in poutine, with similarly tasty results. You could add a nice tanginess by adding some feta or parmesan, if you have it. Lately, I’ve switched to non-pasteurized, old cheddar and the results are excellent. I like to put the cheese onto the fries inside the oven, to melt a little, and even turn a light brown. Again, it’s about options and taste. It’s all up to you what you do with your meal. Some would add the curds and gravy to the fries, stir around so it is a melting mess, others like to layer their food neatly. If you are serving to guests, I would recommend placing the fries on each plate, then adding the cheese, then the gravy on top to melt the cheese a little.

Healthy Poutine. Seriously.

Now that I’ve shared a little dash of this story with you, I hope that you have fun experimenting with taking those traditionally unhealthy treats and turning them into sustenance to truly enjoy!

Experience #1: Khyber Pass Afghan Restaurant

by Natasha Henderson, Montreal

In recent months, I have been working on becoming 95% vegetarian. When I tell people that I have a Once-A-Week-Meat-Eat, they usually laugh and say “then you’re not a vegetarian!”. That is true. I am not a full vegetarian. However, I am aware that there are many, many positive things about being mindful of what one eats. I think it is necessary to understand that if you buy a typical “steak”, this piece of a cow will have been born, raised, slaughtered, and chopped up in the factory-farming system. I would prefer to not support that system. So, I am trying to be more vegetarian both at home and in restaurants.

Fried Eggplant with Yogurt

I recently enjoyed a trip to an Afghan restaurant in Montreal. The Khyber Pass is a medium-sized restaurant, decorated to feel cozy with richly embroidered and decorated tapestries and textiles on the walls and ceilings. For a textile-loving-girl such as myself, this was a wonderful distraction. However, once the food was served, attention shifted from the surroundings to the table.

The meal began with little flat squares of Afghan bread, served warm in a basket. Dipping sauces accompanied them. The sauces were delicious, and varied greatly in flavour, colour, texture, and spice. This all went well with our wine… my group of six people all brought our own wines. The corking service is a delightful advantage of many restaurants in Montreal.

I had walked by the Khyber Pass several times before, usually stopping to read the menu posted outside. Cauliflower, yogurt, eggplant… all looked delicious to me. Of course I also saw lots and lots of lamb. When my friends and I were settled inside, I mentioned what I’d seen on the menu, and my own assumptions about Afghan cooking (lots of lamb). Fortunately, our waiter overheard me, and corrected me. “In Afghanistan, lamb is only cooked for celebrations. Here, Canada, every DAY is a celebration.” His explanation clarified why most every dish on the menu featured lamb. All my friends ordered various lamb dishes (I heard that it was “divine”.) I went Veggie.

My order: Red Lentil and Fresh Coriander soup, Fried Eggplant with Yogurt appetizer, Veggie Combo main dish (eggplant, cauliflower, spinach, okra, and three types of Basmati rice), dessert was a delightful Rosewater with Pistachio pudding.

Red Lentil Soup with Fresh Coriander

The soup was a tangy and pleasantly warm beginning, what one would expect from a spiced lentil soup. Not “remarkable”, but for the warm-up dish, who’d want that? It was similar to soups I make at home. Perfectly fine.

I had the fortune of dining with friends who were so kind as to share their appetizers. Once I’d bitten into it, I realised that my pal’s dumpling actually was filled with (a very tasty) meat. Well, I recommend it for someone who likes their meat, and is looking for something filling and satisfying. They reminded me of my Mom’s “won-tons” that she’d make at Christmas. Deep-fried triangle pockets, filled with hashed meats and diced onions… delicious indeed. I wouldn’t order them, personally, because on a Once-A-Week-Meat-Eat diet it would, perhaps, be a little disappointing.

Meaty Dumplings Ooops!

Another wonderful appetizer that was fortunately shared was the spicy Pumpkin Borani. This was a stewed pumpkin, softly mashed, baked in a small casserole. Served with yogurt and tomatoes, it felt warm and stick-to-your-ribs, full of both vitamins and comfort. The subtle taste of pumpkin was allowed to glow forth in this wonderful dish, I would eat it every day if I could.

My Main Plate

As for the main plate, my friends didn’t offer forth any of their lamb. Granted, I didn’t ask to try any of it, but I think they knew it would be good. There certainly were no complaints! I found my gently flavoured Basmati rice to be divine, the spinach and yogurt and eggplant were all very rich yet homey-tasting. I could feel the vitamins and nutrients concurrently providing energy and flavourful pleasures. Pure and healthy comfort-food.

Everything that I ordered this day, I would order again. Next time, though, I must have some of the Pumpkin Borani, perhaps two or three of them!

Natasha will continue her voyage into Vegetarian Cuisine in Non-Vegetarian Restaurants next week, with a visit to the Bistro Sur la Riviere…

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