Archives for posts with tag: Wool

finished felt

This autumn, we are offering a chance for you to learn (or re-learn!) about the process of making felt fabric from loose wool roving. In this one-afternoon class (about 2 hours) each student will learn the process of felt-making, and produce their own colourful, soft merino wool scarf.

Afternoon classes are being offered Sunday October 27, Sunday November 10, or Sunday November 17 from 3-5pm each day.

Felt is an amazing material. Real felt is made from wool or other animal fibres. It is compressed, agitated, boiled, and manipulated until it becomes a single piece of fabric. Felt was developed in every culture where herding animals were kept, and used not only for clothing but for housing and industrial purposes too.

Class instructor Natasha Henderson is a visual artist, painter, crafter of wool scarves and other wool objects. She loves making things by hand and teaching others how to do so, too. Join in the fun in a supportive environment. Class is mostly offered in English, however, Natasha has a rudimentary knowledge of French, and Francophone students have enjoyed her classes.

Workshop is located in Fleurbain at 460 St Catherine West, Suite #917, H3B 1A7, Montreal. Registration by email or in person. Email for more info: Fleurbain(at)gmail(dot)com

Cost (materials included) is $50 per class.

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puppie

wistful kitteh

At Fleurbain, we are excited to offer a two-evening workshop, in which participants will create a formed puppet out of wet felt.

The workshop takes place over two Tuesday eves in April. The puppet will be a simple “mitten” style, formed seamlessly over a form.

The first night students will learn the feltmaking basics, and create this formed puppet. The next week students will make round felt eyes, needle-felt decorations, and decorate/finish details on the puppet to take home. Choices can be made about “what” or “who” this puppet is… it can be a portrait, a fantasy creature, an alien… a favourite pet.

fancy kitteh

This class is excellent for those who have made a flat felt object (such as a scarf) before, but is also appropriate for those who have not yet made felt. Rest assured, you will be guided through all the stages to ensure your puppet will pup!

The workshop is taught by Natasha Henderson, a painter, fibre artist, arts educator, and Fleurbain’s gallery curator. Her work is exhibited across Canada, and she also offers custom workshops.

TIMES: Tuesday April 16 and Tuesday April 23, 7-8:30pm each night.

COST: $60, all inclusive

REGISTER by responding via email to fleurbain@gmail.com

Workshop is held in Fleurbain, located at 460 Ste-Catherine West, H3B 1A7, Montreal. Suite # 917.

student making felt
felt wool scarf

felt wool scarf

In time for winter, for holiday giving, and for the relaxation of craft… here is an opportunity to learn about feltmaking, while making a beautiful creation of your own that is a unique piece of usable fashion.

In this workshop, students will learn the technique of making felt fabric from loose wool roving. They will make their own beautiful scarf out of merino wool. Merino is insulating, long-lasting, and buttery-soft. The ultimate in fibre! All materials and instruction (and fun) is provided.

Instructor Natasha Henderson is a visual artist, painter, crafter of wool scarves and other wool objects. She loves making things by hand and teaching others how to do so, too. She has years of experience teaching workshops in painting, felt-making, and other crafts. Her work (including felt scarves) is shown and sold in galleries and shops across Canada.

Workshop is one evening: December 12, 7-9pm $50, with everything included!  There will be different colours of wool, so you have a choice to be as vibrant or subtle with your colours as you choose.

 
Located in Fleurbain at 460 St Catherine West, Suite #917, H3B 1A7, Montreal.
 
Registration by email or in person. Email for more info: Fleurbain@gmail.com
abalonescarf

your seat awaits you in the class

We are happy to announce the next fall felt-making workshop: Make your own felt wool scarf!

during a previous workshop

Felt is an amazing material. Real felt is made from wool or other animal fibres. It is compressed, agitated, boiled, and manipulated until it becomes a single piece of fabric. Felt was developed in every culture where herding animals were kept, and used not only for clothing but for housing and industrial purposes too.

In this workshop, students will learn about the technique of making felt fabric from loose wool roving. They will make their own beautiful scarf out of wool. All materials and instruction (and fun) will be provided!

mixed-media scarf by instructor Natasha Henderson

Instructor Natasha Henderson is a visual artist, painter, crafter of wool scarves, puppets, and cat-toys. She loves making things by hand and teaching others how to do so, too. She has years of experience teaching workshops in painting, felt-making, and other crafts. Her work (including felt scarves) is sold in galleries and shops across Canada.

Workshop is on Sunday October 14, 1-3:30pm $45, all inclusive. Fleurbain is at 460 St Catherine West, Suite #917, H3B 1A7, Montreal.

Registration by email or in person. Email for more info: Fleurbain@gmail.com

Felt sushi... higher in fibre

Wanted to get in on Four Weeks of Felt (aka I Love Felt) last time? Well, here is your opportunity!

cutest credit card holder EVER

In Four Weeks of Felt, students will learn how to make felt in the wet-felting process.

We will make:

* a flat project (the ever-popular scarf!)

* a simple form that can be crafted into a cell-phone case or small purse or other nifty little object

* a larger, more complex form using a resist technique (either a larger purse or a vase/vessel, or a tea-cosy)

* jewelry, practical and decorative shapes and little objects (including felt sushi!)

Classes will be held in Fleurbain Tuesday nights, March 27 to April 17, 6:30-9pm. Cost of the four weeks, including all materials and taxes, is $160.

Instructor Natasha Henderson is a visual artist, painter, crafter of wool scarves, puppets, and cat-toys. She loves making things by hand and teaching others how to do so, too. She has years of experience teaching workshops in painting, felt-making, and other crafts. Her work (including felt scarves) can be seen in various galleries and shops, as well as being available online.

Please note class size is limited, so reserve your space today by emailing fleurbain@gmail.com.

We are close to McGill and Place des Arts metros, with plenty of street and paid parking nearby.

Tea’s on!

One evening, Tuesday December 6, 6:30-8:30pm $50, everything included!

Felt is an amazing material. Real felt is made from wool or other animal fibres. It is compressed, agitated, boiled, and manipulated until it becomes a single piece of fabric. Felt was developed in every culture where herding animals were kept, and used not only for clothing but for housing and industrial purposes too.

In this workshop, students will learn about the technique of making felt fabric from loose wool roving. They will make their own elegant, warm, snugly, beautiful, handsome, thick, or thin scarf out of wool. All materials and instruction (and fun) will be provided!

Instructor Natasha Henderson is a visual artist, painter, crafter of wool scarves, puppets, and cat-toys. She loves making things by hand and teaching others how to do so, too. She has years of experience teaching workshops in painting, felt-making, and other crafts. Her work (including felt scarves) can be seen in various galleries and shops, as well as being available for purchase online.

Register online: nhen@videotron.ca
Check out Natasha’s scarves at http://HendersonArt.etsy.com/

Workshop is located in Fleurbain at 460 St Catherine West, Suite #917, H3B 1A7, Montreal.

nesting bowls in felt are cozy, homey, and cute

Felt bowls are cute, no doubt about it. Little fuzzy display bowls that can fit into one another, that’s even cuter! I decided to make some nesting bowls today, and documented the process to share with you.

If you know how to make felt already, and are looking for a craft that will provide you with two or three hours of crafting and will be suitable for an Easter display or gift, look no further. If you haven’t made felt at all yet, I would advise you to first try making a piece or two of flat felt, to get an idea of how felting works.

some of the basic supplies

To start, I gathered my basic felting supplies. I used bubble wrap, soap, a kettle of water, loose wool (roving), scissors, and a measuring tape. You might also like to have a towel on hand, a bowl, and perhaps some paper and a pen.

a trick to cut your templates: fold them in half to ensure each side is even

I thought that I’d like to make three little nesting-bowls. I choose three colours of wool roving that coordinated well together. I decided to blend colours for two of the bowls, and wanted to add dashes of all the colours on all the bowls. I had intended to just make single-colour bowls, but I couldn’t help myself! Obviously, you can use whatever mix of colours you would like.

The basic procedure for making the bowls, no matter what size they are, is relatively simple. The challenge was to make bowls that would “fit into” one another… to account for sizing and so forth. I decided to make a simple bowl shape, then add 1 inch on every side for the next size up. I added about an inch or so to THAT one for the largest bowl. I cut all these templates out of bubble wrap. In retrospect, I’d have preferred to have made some smaller bowls, too. However, as I had saved my templates, I can make smaller ones at a later date.

three layers of roving, and the template on top

To begin any sort of resist felting, lay out three layers of wool roving at right angles to each other, so that they extend about 2 inches past the template-size. In this case, I made sure that the top of the bowl didn’t have this extension, because it would be left open in the end. If I’d wanted to make a more spherical object, I could have extended the top end too. I like to lay my template under my piece of bubble wrap as a guide for the first overlapping layers. However if you find that is too hard to see through the bubble wrap you are working on, you can trace the template shape onto a piece of paper and place this under the bubble wrap to guide you. Remember it is important to extend up to about 2 inches PAST the template-shape, in order to create a meshing of wool.

Once the first three layers of roving have been placed, gently spray some lukewarm water onto them. Be gentle, allowing the water to just fall onto the wool. Next, place your template on top of this. Make sure that the top aligns with the top of the wool. Remember there should be almost 2 inches of extra wool all around the rest of the shape. Take this extra wool and fold onto the template.

encased, with soap on it... ready for boiling water!

The final step before really felting is to lay three more layers of wool roving, at right angles to one another, on top of this. Try to fill the entire “template” area, even though much of it is covered around the edges. This will ensure that there are no holes or awkward seam parts to your bowl.

Spray the wooly work again, being gentle. Then drizzle  pure dish-soap overtop. Pour some boiling (or very hot) water on it, and then lay another piece of bubble wrap on top. Pat it (if it’s not too hot to do so!) and rub it. Pay special attention to rub the seam area… we really want the wool there to mesh quickly. After a minute or so of patting, flip the work over, and pat the other side.

pay special attention to the edges, to ensure the wool meshes

Try opening the bubble-wrap up to rub the wool directly. Within a minute or so of patting and rubbing, you should be able to gently lift the object. Pry open the top part, and gently rub the edges. If it’s fused, force it open. It’s ok at this point; you can do almost anything to this malleable mass.

this doesn't look much like a bowl... but it will!!

Lift the object, turn it in your hands. Rub the inside and outside of the seam area. If there are sparse patches or holes, try adding a little more wool roving on top. Put some more soap, a dash of water, and gently rub it in your hands. Work on the seam area, and rub the entire object.

Turn it inside out, and rub the inside on your bubble wrap. turn it back outside-out, and rub the whole object on the bubble wrap. Keep it open, don’t allow it to lay flat again.

After a few minutes, you can gently drop the object onto the table. Do this a few times, trying to hit a different part of the bowl each time. Start to hit it harder; and focus on any bumps or strange parts. It is almost magical, how the wool will tighten into felt as you do this. It will shrink quite a great deal, too! If you have a bathtub nearby, try hurling the wooly mass into it several times. Start more gentle, then hurl with all your might.

while hurling, rubbing, getting the bowl felted and fulled and shrunk. ten seconds later, the seam had disappeared. Like magic.

If the bowl is cold, pour some more boiling or hot water on it. Friction, compression, and heat all conspire to turn wool into felt. So, more heat can’t hurt!

Finally, when your bowl is looking like a bowl, set it. You can set it “rim-side-up” on a table, or you can stuff it with bubble wrap (like I’ve done in the examples) and turn upside down. Like a sweater that you lay flat to dry, wool felt will have a memory. It likes to maintain the shape that it is left to dry in.

after being felted, fulled, and rinsed, I formed my bowls by cramming bubblewrap into them, and leaving overnight on my table.

If you are in the Montreal area and would like to take a felt-making class, please be in contact with me. I will be teaching this technique (and more!) in workshops of varying lengths. Happy felting!

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

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