Archives for posts with tag: intuition

Life Lines. 38″x38″ Oil on canvas. Darlene St Georges

Opening with an evening vernissage next Saturday June 16 at 7pm, please join us and Darlene St Georges for her solo exhibition, From Left to Right.

Darlene’s work is incredible, intricate, thought-provoking and enveloping. As with all excellent painting, it should be experienced rather than just seen.  Washes, glazes, and layers of oil paint create a sublime surface of incredible depths for the viewer.

Of her work, Darlene says:

“I call this selected collection “From Left to Right”. These works explore the form, movement, light and energy of the organic in nature – releasing me into an aesthetic of the epiphany. The intention of these written works are to offer the viewer a point of entry for reflection.

My aim in creating these works was not to represent what I think but rather to explore what I know – somewhere inside me about the essence of things. It has been a process of connecting with my intuition and responding to those moments of epiphany – experiences I have had throughout my life where everything seems to simply connect in a fleeting spark, which alleviates and elevates me. In this position and I am released from the left side that orchestrates the list, schedules and plans that shape my life from day to day, month to month, year after year.

While painting I enter through the right into an alternative space-time dimension; seeing through and beyond into the essence of things. Here, I connect with and develop my intuitive, metacognative and metaphorical knowledge, which activates my imagination and ignites an energy that engages my whole being. For me this is an aesthetic of the epiphany that I can conjure up that affords me with a broader vision of what is possible, which I carry back into the world.”

Flora. 12″x12″ Oil on canvas. Darlene St Georges

Exhibited alongside the paintings will be some of Darlene’s poetry; work that further transports you to another time, thought, and place. This one, in particular, speaks to me about painting, creativity, and being connected to our natural world:

Immutable schedule of something imprecise.
I vanish;
transfixed and motionless, without restraint.
I recapture enchantment and dreams of splendor;
labyrinths of memories wash over my body;
remote cusps and oxygen.

From Left to Right continues to July 7


***
See the online version of the show here.*** Work is all available for purchase, in person or online.

Vernissage June 16, 7-9pm at Fleurbain, 460 St Catherine St West Unit 917

Hours Thursdays 3-6pm, Saturdays and Sundays 12-6pm

See Darlene’s catalogue of the show here.

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Natasha Henderson, Montreal

Hanging art is something of an art in itself. There are rules and tips and advice and stuff that people go by, like “the middle must be so-and-so inches from the ground”. This might work sometimes, but certainly not always. I actually forget what that magical number is! I do know, however, that whenever I’ve tried to follow any of those rules, odds are that the final result will look a little weird.

Learn to trust your gut when it comes to balancing out artworks with surrounding aspects of the room.

To hang art, you need to take many, many factors into consideration. How high are the walls? How wide is the available space? Is there furniture nearby? How bright is the art, does it contrast with everything else in the room or does it blend in? Is there odd lighting at some time of the day? Is the artwork visually top-heavy? If I hang this tiny painting on a large wall… will it look silly? So many of the answers are based on gut feelings. You need to experiment, try different spots, different pieces in different places, and one day you will learn to trust your gut.

Play around with the groupings, if you are so inclined and are so blessed to have so much art.

To start you along this path of trusting-your-gut, I will make a few suggestions (besides encouraging you to make many holes in the wall). If you have small work and a large wall, try hanging it off-centre. Think: “Syncopation“. Off-kilter, off-centre… a little high or a little low. Something to make your eye try something a little different with the available space. Art should be something that makes the viewer think and consider, to take pause… so curating a wall of art is a responsibility. It’s a chance to say something, besides What’s The Current Trend. Another option is to display small works in a cluster. Some would stress over frames, sizes… but try to let go of stress. It’s just so much easier this way. You don’t NEED to use a tape measure, string, pencil, etc for a grid. Just try to make it. It’ll be ok.

If you have a tall, skinny work to hang in a given space, try it aligned more to the right than in the middle. This works REALLY well if you also have something like a floor-lamp, or free-standing chair that you would like nearby the wall too. If it’s in a foyer, it is useful to have a wall to lean on sometimes, or a place to temporarily leave luggage or the vacuum without fear. We do need to think about our practical lives, not just our aesthetic ones.

Hanging smaller-scale paintings is not a science, it is a simple art.

I think that having a bit of paint in the current wall-colour of your home might be useful. So is having a little bit of spackle (or Dap or whatever, wall-goo) and a spatula. I cannot emphasise enough: Please Try And Lose The Fear of changing your artworks around. Honestly, once you’ve got the general placement for a piece of art, you can start nailing. Try to shoot “low”. Then, if it turns out that it is too low indeed, the artwork will cover any stray holes from earlier hanging-attempts. You can fill in the holes, dry, sand, paint over… or don’t. It depends on you. If you will be annoyed by knowing it’s not perfect wall underneath your art, then fix it up. Or follow the Natasha Way, and don’t bother! It’s much more fun to make puff-pastry than to perfect a wall that no-one will see.

Trust your gut, fiddle around with placement and height, so that it feels "right" in the room.

In general, in general, you can look at the visual centre of a piece of art… and make that at “about” eye-level, or slightly lower. Really, it goes against all my experience and instincts to give a rule-of-thumb about hanging art. Now, what is important to take note of, is that the “visual centre” is rarely ever the physical centre of a painting. It’s normally about one-third of the distance down from the top of the work. That’s just the comfortable compositional ratio, what normally happens in most works.  Ok, enough of these technicalities. I don’t like making rules about this sort of thing. Did you sense that? Yep, listen to your gut!!!

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