Archives for posts with tag: gallery

In the gallery space Fleurbain through January and February is a changing selection of painting, feltworks, and craft by artist and curator Natasha Henderson.

large and small painting by Natasha Henderson

large and small painting by Natasha Henderson

Works will be available to view through the end of February, when an exciting new interactive project will be unveiled for Nuit Blanche in Montreal!

Natasha will host gallery hours Tuesday-Thursday 3pm-6pm, as well as other days by appointment.

making merino scarves

making merino scarves

Besides visiting to see the artworks in Fleurbain and chatting with our resident artist-curator, you can opt to participate in workshops in painting and feltmaking. On Wednesday January 30 join us from 7-9pm to make your own merino felt wool scarf. You will learn the process of wet-felt making, and create your own colourful and soft, beautiful scarf to take home at the end of the night. Register by email: Fleurbain@gmail.com Cost is only $50, everything included.

student relaxing over some tisane and painting

student relaxing over some tisane and painting

Another upcoming workshop (or, rather, a series of them) is Second Sunday. Drop in to paint the Second Sunday of each month. Our first session is February 10, from 1pm-3pm. $40 for everything, all materials, encouragement, and a nice cuppa tea. Brush up on your existing skills, problem-solve, relax, and get creative. All levels of experience are welcome. Email Fleurbain@gmail.com for more details or to reserve a spot (drop-ins are always welcome, but class size is limited to eight students.) Note in May, the class is bumped to the third Sunday, to accommodate Mother’s Day.

Hope to see you soon in Fleurbain.

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

Fleurbain is located at 460 St Catherine West, Unit 917. We have a stunning view of St James United Church, and the city of Montreal.

Small Works Too

Small Works Too

I am feeling pretty lucky. The exhibition, Small Works Too, is well received. The dozens of works by ten talented and unique artists are going to be celebrated again, with a midissage, this Saturday.

Alright. A midissage is like a vernissage. The difference is that it is in the middle of the exhibition’s dates. Sometimes you will see a finissage. I had thought of having one of those. However, this time I figured that would probably not be a good idea, as the show ends right when half the city’s population is away from the city, or is home recovering from holiday overindulgence.

If you cannot make it to the party this Saturday (December 15th at 7pm) there are other chances to see the show. I would like to mention, however, that Sunday the 16th isn’t one of those chances. I won tickets to a piano concert!!! I play piano, and love live music, and… well… come to the midissage on the 15th! Or please pop by Fleurbain any Tuesday-Thursday in between 3-6pm. You can also see it online here.

I hope you have a wonderful holiday season. Let it be festive, bright, and full of love, music, and art.

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

Selective Retrospective until November 30

On now at Fleurbain until November 30 is a selection of works by painter Natasha Henderson.

You might know me (Natasha) from Fleurbain. Perhaps you know me from this blog, where I write about art, life, gardening, crafts, DIY, and more. Maybe you have taken a felt-making workshop with me, or joined in a drop-in-painting session in Fleurbain. What you might not know is that I have been a professionally exhibiting painter since 1998.

Changes. Oil on wood

I moved to Montreal from British Columbia in 2007. Since then, I have had a few studio spaces, from home-based ones, to massive industrial ones, to small corners in shared spaces. All the time, I have been painting. Now, I am opting to exhibit a few of my absolute favourite pieces that are still in my collection. Granted there are others that I would have loved to include, but you can pick out your faves from my website, if you would like.

Here is a spin around the exhibition. If you can make it in person, we are open Tuesdays to Thursdays, 3-6pm, and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 6pm. Hope to see you!

Fleurbain is located at 460 St Catherine West, unit 917 in downtown Montreal. Very close to Place des Arts and McGill metros. Open Tuesday-Thursday 3-6, and Saturday-Sunday 12-6.

Our first exhibition in Fleurbain’s gallery space is on until December 7th…

Natasha Henderson presents Point Counter Point, a suite of paintings that use the music and concepts of JS Bach as a point of beginning.

Dolce

The works are richly layered with paint and ideas. Counterpoint is a method of music in which concurrent themes or melodies play. Themes bounce off one another, unique voices and harmonies are created by the combination of individual ideas. This can be related to paint, to life, to art. Everything affects everything else, or can do.

Natasha, specifically, has layered simple images that represent syncopated time (big dot, little dot… repeat!) with ideas of landscape’s representation, and images of drapery. During the process of painting, if Natasha felt a need to incorporate other images to make the painting sing, she would do so. Objects and subjects from the artist’s own iconography make an appearance: robins, Christmas lights, trees.

Cantata

Amongst the patterns of paint there is a sense of lighting from within, that what the viewer sees is somehow backlit. Viewers of the works have described them on a range from eerie to spiritual… come and see for yourself!

Point Counter Point runs until December 7. Regular gallery hours are 3pm-6pm Tuesday through Sunday, and by appointment. Fleurbain is located at 460 St Catherine Street West, unit #917. email fleurbain@gmail.com for more info

"Dolce". Oil on canvas. 14"x18". 2010. copyright Natasha Henderson.

Natasha Henderson is a painter who has resided in Montreal for almost four years. Originally from Comox, British Columbia, she graduated with her BFA from the Emily Carr University in Vancouver in 1998. Her work has been exhibited and collected across North America.

"Ghazal Four". Oil on canvas. 18"x24". 2009.

Her paintings delve into questions about artistic representations of landscape. She uses the language and codes of other artistic forms, such as poetry and music, to examine representations of thought and meaningful patterns within her painting.

"Gathering". Oil on canvas. 20"x30". 2010. copyright Natasha Henderson.

Environmental concerns are touched on in her work, however, those concerns are not forefront. She combines an aching beauty, a seeking of light and meaning, along with the recognition that there is a cycle of life that sometimes just stops.

"Fracture". Oil on canvas. 30"x36". 2010. copyright Natasha Henderson.

In the future she plans to paint using home-made (free range) egg tempera paints and to eliminate toxic chemicals completely from her practice. See much more of her work at NatashaHenderson.com.

"Fermata". Oil on canvas. 48"x36". 2010. copyright Natasha Henderson.

Part of an exhibition in a Public Art Gallery, 2004

Galleries can be intimidating for artists to approach. Knowledge is power, so it is important to understand a bit about galleries before you approach them. Most galleries have websites so you don’t have to go pummel the person working there with questions, and you can research many different galleries from the comfort of your computer-screen. I do recommend walking into your chosen gallery a few times before submitting your portfolio, if possible. On-line, a gallery (like any other business or organisation) will present themselves in their best light. Get to know the reputation of the gallery and staff who work there. It’s good, too, to get a feel for the “fit” of your work with the work they currently show.

There are a few different types of galleries. Please note that I am located in Canada, and other countries have slightly different legal and practical models for galleries. These Canadian types of galleries are Public Galleries (in the USA these are closest to Art Museums), Artist-Run Centres, Co-Ops, and Commercial Galleries.

There are many sizes of Public Gallery. Often a larger city will have a larger Public art Gallery, but this isn’t always the case. A lot of towns and cities have a very minor art gallery, while others have several types of Public art galleries. A lot depends on the funding situation in a given city or province. Some cities and towns have colleges and universities; these tend to have good and better-funded (due to better attendance) art galleries. Many of the smaller art galleries have “submission” sections in their websites. However, as is often the case with other sorts of galleries, sometimes the “submissions” section isn’t exactly in bold type. Check out the “contact” and “information” pages, and if you still don’t see anything, don’t be shy to send a polite, short email to see if they accept artist submissions, and if there are any specifications for them. Larger institutions normally do not accept submissions from artists, however, it can’t hurt to acquaint their curators with your work.

Another type of gallery whose purpose is to advance art and culture, and not to make money, is the Artist Run Centre. It is important to note that a lot of Co-Op style galleries call themselves this, even though they do not really fit in this category. In Canada, an Artist-Run Centre is one that pays artists to show. This is similar to the Public Galleries, in that they adhere to the CARFAC fee schedule. These galleries have a mandate, a board of governors, and are distinctly non-profit. There are many hoops that a gallery must fit through before they are a true Artist-Run-Centre in Canada, and thus they are highly respected galleries, much like the Public galleries. Normally they have a range of cultural services and events outside of exhibitions, like publications, installation and integration into the larger community, and public events. This is a good link to lists of these galleries, as well as other nifty Canadian things.

Co-Op style galleries usually are run by artists, but they do not adhere to the “artist-run” rules. These galleries offer a range of exhibition and other opportunities. In my experience, they are great for local artists to obtain studio space, socialize with one another, and to have more informal exhibitions. As a self-supporting artist I am turned off by many of these galleries, though, because not only do they not pay artists to show, but ask for artists to pay for their exhibition space. Personally, I do not want to be a part of that. Other artists claim some success with this, though, if they have highly marketable work that just needs to be seen to be purchased. Galleries-For-Hire are good for commercially successful artists who want to circumvent the Commercial Gallery system.

Commercial Galleries are there to sell art. There are, indeed, Commercial Galleries that have a mandate to advance art and propose to support culture with events, concerts, publications, and other goodies. A really good Commercial Gallery will integrate itself into the world, and not just pander to the lowest common denominator. These galleries, generally, take about 40-50% of the retail price of works. In my experience, this can be a good way to reach an audience who would otherwise never see your work. A good gallerist works hard, and is worth every cent of their commission. A bad gallerist can do any number of bad things, from not being friendly and professional to people entering the gallery, to not paying the artists in good time, to not promoting well… to outright theft of artworks. It can get ugly. Listen to the rumour-mill about galleries’ reputations in your town before submitting your portfolio.

Most application packages (with many exceptions) require some basic stuff: A dvd of between 10 and 20 works, a co-responding Image List, an Artist Statement, and a CV. Sometimes the gallery requires a Project Proposal (especially the Artist-Run and Public Galleries) to know what specifically you would like to exhibit there, and what is your academic or theoretical bent. From time to time, you will find a gallery that accepts submissions on-line. This can be a challenge because normally they only want a scant few images of your work. However, it costs nothing to email. Sometimes the gallery lists a request for a SASE (self-addressed, stamped envelope) to return your materials. I would suggest doing so, as it appears that you care about your work, and your information is precious to you. Personally, I need to take my own advice in this regard. Normally I don’t supply the SASE, as I know that in the three to six months that it will take for them to get back to me, my portfolio and CV will have changed. But… I will try to take my own advice from now on.

A Final Word of Support: As with any venture, as long as you cross your ‘”t”s and dot your “i”s, you should expect about a 10% (or less) success rate. Keep those packages flying out the door. When they are sent back with a polite (or not-so polite, or non-existent) rejection letter, do not fret. We all go through this, it is part of the game. If you are an organised-type, take notes of when submission packages are called for by galleries. Note it in your calendar, and you can produce a few submission packages at a time. This saves you time and effort. I usually settle into this about three times a year, and get out about a dozen within a day or two. That being said, it’s a good idea to keep checking in case special calls to artists should come up. Also, try not to re-submit the same proposal to a gallery. Gallery Committees and Curators have good memories.

Best of luck, and see you in the galleries!

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

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