Archives for posts with tag: exhibitions

Art and Architecture is a group exhibition that brings together six artists. The work examines ideas about architecture, and ideas about our use of space, our cities, and our history. Some of the artists are also trained in architecture and are practicing architects as well as visual artists.

Burano - Denise Buisman Pilger

Denise Buisman Pilger shares three pieces with us… all mixed media acrylic collage on wood or canvas. These paintings take scenes and snippets of life from a specific place, and reconstruct them. They are like condensed visions of experiences.

Vers Brooklyn - Marc Chabot

Marc Chabot has three larger pieces, as well as two smaller pieces in the show. They are mixed media collage and paint on wood. All are ruminations on New York. They layer images from diverse sources, interwoven and infused into a new surface.

Naomi Frangos is displaying the Utopia series, as well as a single simple and lovely piece “of snow”. The Utopia series is a collection of four ceramic hand mono-printed tiles. They reflect upon ancient architecture, as well as ideas of weaving time and space through process. During the opening of the exhibition, she also shared her amazing and masterful Fig Vessel ceramic work.

of warp and weft 1 - Naomi Frangos

The Tower - Jennifer Hamilton

Jennifer Hamilton‘s piece The Tower is a large digital print of sacred places, transformed into one fantastical, imagined entity. For me it feels like a trip to Disneyland!

Mycelial Kingdom - Kimerley Mok

Kimberley Mok (some might recall her work from our Small Works show last December) is sharing five prints with us, three of which are available in a large and small format. Her work looks at architecture, nature, places, Montreal, and stirs in a healthy mix of fancy, fantasy, and wonder.

Room - Keivan Khademi Shamami

Finally, Keivan Khademi Shamami is showing two pieces that further walk into ideas surrounding history of place. They wonder at what has transpired before, asking about what layers of time and meaning are found in a place.

The exhibition is in Fleurbain at 460 St Catherine Street West, Unit 917 until April 17th. We are open regular gallery hours Saturday and Sunday 3-6pm, as well as by appointment, please email: fleurbain@gmail.com

See all the individual work online, too. All work in the exhibition is here. Note for collectors, all prices include taxes and shipping to anywhere in North America.

If you want a little taste of how the works in the show all relate to one another, you can enjoy the following video:

Artist Talks will be held on two days.

On March 31 from 7-9pm, Marc Chabot, Naomi Frangos, and Keivan Khademi Shamami will talk about their work.

On April 14 from 3-5pm, Kimberley Mok, Jennifer Hamilton, and Denise Buisman Pilger will talk.

Come meet the artists, and join in the talk about architecture, space, art, life in the city, and more.

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

Structure Cigale (Small I) by Francoise Issaly

Some of Montreal’s artistic talents have come forth to present their gifts… to you. Visit us at Fleurbain during this season to take in some painting, photography and more… not to mention a cup of tea or glass of wine (depending on time of day!)

Garden Party 3 by Carole Arbic

BIG VERNISSAGE: Saturday December 10, 6-9pm
Sunday December 11, 3-9pm (informal fun vernissage part two!)

Tuesday December 13 to Friday Dec 16, 3-6pm each day
Saturday December 17 EXTENDED HOURS 11am to 9pm

Sunday December 18 to Friday December 30, 3-6pm each day except Monday.
Closed Christmas Eve, Christmas, and Boxing Day.

Tuesday January 3 to Friday January 6, 3pm-6pm each day. Saturday January 7th Finissage!!! 12 noon ’til 6pm…

Abundance by Lorraine Miller Emmrys

Work may be purchased and taken away for gift wrapping/giving on the spot. If you can’t make it to the show, or would like to look at individual works again, please see our online gallery

Come join us for some festive fun. Tea’s always on…

All images copyright the artists.

Our first exhibition in Fleurbain’s gallery space is on until December 7th…

Natasha Henderson presents Point Counter Point, a suite of paintings that use the music and concepts of JS Bach as a point of beginning.

Dolce

The works are richly layered with paint and ideas. Counterpoint is a method of music in which concurrent themes or melodies play. Themes bounce off one another, unique voices and harmonies are created by the combination of individual ideas. This can be related to paint, to life, to art. Everything affects everything else, or can do.

Natasha, specifically, has layered simple images that represent syncopated time (big dot, little dot… repeat!) with ideas of landscape’s representation, and images of drapery. During the process of painting, if Natasha felt a need to incorporate other images to make the painting sing, she would do so. Objects and subjects from the artist’s own iconography make an appearance: robins, Christmas lights, trees.

Cantata

Amongst the patterns of paint there is a sense of lighting from within, that what the viewer sees is somehow backlit. Viewers of the works have described them on a range from eerie to spiritual… come and see for yourself!

Point Counter Point runs until December 7. Regular gallery hours are 3pm-6pm Tuesday through Sunday, and by appointment. Fleurbain is located at 460 St Catherine Street West, unit #917. email fleurbain@gmail.com for more info

Natasha Henderson, Montreal

Hanging art is something of an art in itself. There are rules and tips and advice and stuff that people go by, like “the middle must be so-and-so inches from the ground”. This might work sometimes, but certainly not always. I actually forget what that magical number is! I do know, however, that whenever I’ve tried to follow any of those rules, odds are that the final result will look a little weird.

Learn to trust your gut when it comes to balancing out artworks with surrounding aspects of the room.

To hang art, you need to take many, many factors into consideration. How high are the walls? How wide is the available space? Is there furniture nearby? How bright is the art, does it contrast with everything else in the room or does it blend in? Is there odd lighting at some time of the day? Is the artwork visually top-heavy? If I hang this tiny painting on a large wall… will it look silly? So many of the answers are based on gut feelings. You need to experiment, try different spots, different pieces in different places, and one day you will learn to trust your gut.

Play around with the groupings, if you are so inclined and are so blessed to have so much art.

To start you along this path of trusting-your-gut, I will make a few suggestions (besides encouraging you to make many holes in the wall). If you have small work and a large wall, try hanging it off-centre. Think: “Syncopation“. Off-kilter, off-centre… a little high or a little low. Something to make your eye try something a little different with the available space. Art should be something that makes the viewer think and consider, to take pause… so curating a wall of art is a responsibility. It’s a chance to say something, besides What’s The Current Trend. Another option is to display small works in a cluster. Some would stress over frames, sizes… but try to let go of stress. It’s just so much easier this way. You don’t NEED to use a tape measure, string, pencil, etc for a grid. Just try to make it. It’ll be ok.

If you have a tall, skinny work to hang in a given space, try it aligned more to the right than in the middle. This works REALLY well if you also have something like a floor-lamp, or free-standing chair that you would like nearby the wall too. If it’s in a foyer, it is useful to have a wall to lean on sometimes, or a place to temporarily leave luggage or the vacuum without fear. We do need to think about our practical lives, not just our aesthetic ones.

Hanging smaller-scale paintings is not a science, it is a simple art.

I think that having a bit of paint in the current wall-colour of your home might be useful. So is having a little bit of spackle (or Dap or whatever, wall-goo) and a spatula. I cannot emphasise enough: Please Try And Lose The Fear of changing your artworks around. Honestly, once you’ve got the general placement for a piece of art, you can start nailing. Try to shoot “low”. Then, if it turns out that it is too low indeed, the artwork will cover any stray holes from earlier hanging-attempts. You can fill in the holes, dry, sand, paint over… or don’t. It depends on you. If you will be annoyed by knowing it’s not perfect wall underneath your art, then fix it up. Or follow the Natasha Way, and don’t bother! It’s much more fun to make puff-pastry than to perfect a wall that no-one will see.

Trust your gut, fiddle around with placement and height, so that it feels "right" in the room.

In general, in general, you can look at the visual centre of a piece of art… and make that at “about” eye-level, or slightly lower. Really, it goes against all my experience and instincts to give a rule-of-thumb about hanging art. Now, what is important to take note of, is that the “visual centre” is rarely ever the physical centre of a painting. It’s normally about one-third of the distance down from the top of the work. That’s just the comfortable compositional ratio, what normally happens in most works.  Ok, enough of these technicalities. I don’t like making rules about this sort of thing. Did you sense that? Yep, listen to your gut!!!

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